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Bayshore Counseling Services are Funded in part by:

Mental Health and Recovery Board of Erie and Ottawa Counties



UW

"The services I received helped change my life. Thank you Bayshore Counseling Services"
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steve, Sandusky

The mission of Bayshore Counseling Services is to create a system of care that will engage individuals in prevention, mental health, and recovery services in order to become participants in a healthy community. We provide a complete range of mental health, chemical dependency, prevention, intervention and treatment services for adults, adolescents, children and their families in an outpatient setting.

Consumers are expected to be an active participant in their treatment. All services are provided by qualified clinicians and therapists who adhere to their professional code of ethics.


Office Hours

8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday
Other times by appointment
or special program.

To Schedule an Appointment

1.800.686.0088 Sandusky Office
419.734.5535 Port Clinton Office
and ask for the Intake Department

Serving Erie and Ottawa Counties
at two locations

1218 Cleveland Road, Suite B
Sandusky, Ohio 44870
419.626.9156 | 1.800.686.0088
fax 419.621.0099

201 Madison Street, 1st Floor
Port Clinton, Ohio 43452
419.734.5535
fax 419.734.5536

Visit Mental Health and Recovery Board Erie and Ottawa Counties on the internet.

Bayshore Counseling Services
Board of Directors

Wayne Walter, President
Stan Stewart, Vice-President
Greg Sherman, Secretary-Treasurer
Merle Arndt
Sharon Barnes
Mary Churchwell
James L. Fisher (ret. 11/20/13)
Richard Grubbe
Dorothy Kent
Chris Marinko
Carolyn Oakley

Message from Bayshore, March 2014

Effective Ways to Discipline a Child

• Separation. Have children rest or play apart for a time when they irritate one another, fight, squabble, hit and kick. Being apart for a while lets each child calm down. Then you can use the other ways to encourage better behavior.
• Behavior management. Talk with children calmly to learn what happened, why and how they see it. Then talk about ways to deal with the situation. Come to a solution that is agreeable to both you and the child. This helps children learn to be responsible. For their behavior.
• Redirection. When children get into trouble, stop them, explain why you are stopping them and suggest another activity. When they scribble on the wall, give them paper and crayons. When they race dangerously indoors, take them outside for a game of chase. When they throw books at each other, gather them for a story time or organize a beanbag toss. This works especially well with very young children.
• Fix-up. When children cause trouble or hurt, expect them to fix it, or at least to help. If they spill milk, give them a cloth to clean it up. If they break a toy, ask them to help you fix it. If they make a child cry, have them help with the soothing. If they throw toys around the room, ask them to put them away.
• Ignore. The best way to deal with misbehavior aimed at getting your attention is to simply ignore it. But be sure to give attention to your children when they behave well. Children need attention for good behavior, not misbehavior.
• Be firm. Clearly and firmly state, or even demand that the child do what needs to be done. Do not use a wishy-washy tone of voice. Speak in a tone that lets your child know that you mean what you say and that you expect your child to do it. Being firm doesn't mean yelling, threatening, reasoning or taking away privileges. Being firm works for children at any age and for many situations.
• Stay in control. Act before the situation gets out of control, before you get angry and overly frustrated and before the child's behavior becomes unreasonable.
• Be detached. In other words, "keep your cool." If your child does something you don't approve of, or is wrong, pretend your child is your neighbor's child and ask yourself, "What would I do?" Or imagine that you are your child's teacher. How would the teacher handle this situation? That is how you might handle it, too.

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1.800.686.0088
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